Online
dictionary
    tools

 

Online dictionary tools


Install an extension and you can double-click or alt-click on a word and the meaning or translation of the word will pop-up in a small window or in a new tab window.

If you are reading an entry in the dictionary and you don’t know the meaning of a word in it, double-click on the unknown word to look it up.



In this screencast you can see how easy and useful such a dictionary extension can be.














Extensions for Firefox

If you are using Firefox at the moment, click on one of the links below to install such a dictionary add-on. There are quite a lot of different ones, but I prefer the ones that use the Oxford or Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary.
The add-ons can be used together too.

Pop-up Dictionary




Double-click and click on a small icon to open the pop-up window.

Open the options of the add-on and add Cambridge Dictionaries:

             - 'http://dictionary.cambridge.org/search/british/direct/?q=$$'

             - Size: 700 (width) x 400 (heigth)


Swift Selection Search




Manual on my Dutch website: Nederlands digitaal.

The URL’s to be used In Selection Search are ...

             - https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/{searchTerms}

             - https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/{searchTerms}


Extensions for Google Chrome

If you are using Google Chrome at the moment, click on one of the links below
to install a dictionary extension. These extensions can be used together!


Google Dictionary




Alt-click on a word to get the small pop-up window.
The database also recognises proper names.

Selection Search



Manual on my Dutch website: Nederlands digitaal.

The URL’s to be used In Selection Search are ...

             - https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/%s

             - https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/%s



Some advice on looking up words with a dictionary tool

A dictionary tool doesn't recognise the function of a word.
An example:
'sound' may be
    a verb ('sounds interesting'),
    a noun ('the sound of a bell'),
    an adjective ('Considering his age, his body is quite sound.')
    or an adverb ("sound asleep').
    It may also be part of a phrasal verb ('He's always sounding off                    
    about how he thinks the country should be run.')
    or an idiom ('be as sound as a bell').
So, you have to choose the correct entry yourself in the search results.

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